Libertyfarm.nl is my blog that I use to illustrate my view on current affairs in branding, media and marketing communications: I believe that the industry is changing from the top-down advertising model to the content-relationship model. Check out my presentation on the subject or contact me to ask me how.

Call Center Prank

Posted by: on Jan 27, 2014 | No Comments

This blog previously appeared on Amsterdamadblog.com

Readers of my Amsterdam Ad Blog columns know that I am a strong advocate of what has become known in our industry as humanizing brands: the process of reversing the lack of trust in brands, by getting rid of brand mythology and showing the outside world what really goes down behind the shiny logo and dito TV commercials instead. Logically, the fact that the people of Amsterdam agency Pool Worldwide persuaded Dutch insurance company Centraal Beheer into a humanizing brand project filled me with joy. Hats off to both!

For a small country like Holland, the video is reasonably successful: according to YouTube, over 225,000 people viewed the video up until now. Additionally, over 77,000 people viewed the video on Dumpert.nl, it generated 5000 Facebook likes and it is much talked about on twitter. A quick scan also showed that online sentiment concerning the video is mostly positive. Especially call center worker Wesley, who breaks into tears while witnessing a faux childbirth on the phone, is receiving many props. The time of the year works in his advance, I guess.

Beyond the Hype: On Branded Content as a Serious Marketing Tool

Beyond the Hype: On Branded Content as a Serious Marketing Tool

Posted by: on Dec 24, 2013 | No Comments

Branded Content is currently a hype. In my freshly uploaded slide deck, I try to explain what need to be done at brand strategy level first, in order to be able use branded content as a serious marketing tool. Check my presentation on slideshare.net

Humanizing Branding

Humanizing Branding

Posted by: on Okt 30, 2013 | No Comments

This blog previously appeared on Amsterdamadblog.com

Trust in brands is declining. This may not come as a surprise. Nevertheless, I was still a little overwhelmed by the results Google presented to me when I entered the key words ‘brand’ and ‘trust’. A small outtake:

  • According to Y&R’s Brand Asset Valuator, the number of brands that consumers confirm they trust halved between 2001 and 2010.
  • Nielsen’s Global Trust in Advertising Survey states that 92% of consumers around the world trust recommendations from friends and family above all other forms of advertising; an increase of 18% since 2007.
  • Forrester research shows that only 10% of European consumers trust post by brands on social media sites like Facebook or Twitter.
  • Etcetera…
The sixties reinvented

The sixties reinvented

Posted by: on Jul 12, 2013 | No Comments

This blog previously appeared on Amsterdamadblog.com

What do these observations from my personal life have in common?

  • A growing number of friends feel the secret urge to swap the hustle and bustle of the big city for a quiet rural life.
  • Last Saturday, my girlfriend bought a long, wide dress, made of a very colorful fabric (which suited her surprisingly well).
  • Singer-songwriter Jake Bugg plainly mimics Bob Dylan, which brought him a lot of success recently.

There is a revival of the sixties going on, which fills me with joy: during my adolescent years in the eighties I heavily resented my parents for not having been a part of the hippie scene two decades earlier. Luckily, I now have my chance to be part of something that is going to change the world in quite a positive way. And I am hopeful that this time around, it is going to succeed.

The symbiosis between newspapers and brands

The symbiosis between newspapers and brands

Posted by: on Jul 9, 2013 | No Comments

This blog previously appeared on Amsterdamadblog.com

This month, the European finale of ‘Best YET’ will be organized: a newspaper ad competition for young advertising creatives. The lure: the creative team which develops the most creative and impactful newspaper ad, will be send to the Cannes Lions. In my opinion, the existence of the Best YET competition proves that the newspaper industry still regards advertising in a way too traditional manner: as space to be sold in between the editorial pages, with ‘reach’ being the not-so-unique-selling-point.

But I believe that newspapers can become a much more effective and surprisingly relevant medium for advertisers than a mere creative ad competition promises them. How? To get to the answer, let’s study the ads that advertisers still run in todays’ newspapers.

True story: a bank that became a media company

True story: a bank that became a media company

Posted by: on Apr 22, 2013 | No Comments

How many banks can you think of that put so much faith in the power of brand content that they began producing award-winning television and video shows on a daily basis? No matter how hard you try, it’s likely you’ll only come up with one: Jyske (pronounced You-ska) Bank. Jyske Bank has created one of the most high-tech, in-house television production studios in Denmark. In fact, the company refers to itself as both a bank and a media company. Read the story here

A (small) case of story mining.

A (small) case of story mining.

Posted by: on Apr 18, 2013 | No Comments

Rewind to the column I wrote for Amsterdam Adblog – a small excerpt:

(…) In his book ‘Program or Be Programmed‘, media philosopher Douglas Rushkoff writes: “Digital technology is biased against fiction and towards facts”. According to Rushkoff, the Internet essentially (but not solely) a non-fictional space. Internet restores the powerful peer-to-peer dialogues and transactions back to the situation before mass media took over. On the internet, people are in conversation with one another; they add value to products by the information they share. This includes gossip, news, emotions, and facts. When it comes to brands, Rushkoff says: “When people on the net talk about brands, they don’t talk about the myths built around brands. They talk about the stuff that brakes the myth.” Which means the only option for brands communicating in these spaces is to tell the truth. (…)

Schoolbook Creative Strategy

Posted by: on Mrt 7, 2013 | No Comments

This is a great (fictional) example of creative strategy development!! The case concerns the business problem of Hollywood celebrity Lindsay Lohan: her public image has reached rock bottom in such a way, that it affects her work severely: studios and directors don’t want to work with her anymore. The case is a schoolbook example of ‘societal relevant brand development’ as we like to call it at TMG, resulting in a brand (in this case La Lohan herself) taking a true stand on a significant societal issue. As an icing on the cake, the strategists develop a (digital) media strategy and they define KPI’s and an accompanying research plan. Hats off!

A slight side remark: besides the digital choices in media that the strategists make, I don’t understand what makes this strategy so digital. To me, it is plain brand strategy, developed out of a societal relevant insight. Yes, the strategy translates itself well into digital media. But I don’t think that, for example,  traditional advertising or generating free publicity in  traditional media will pose any problem…Let’s forget about the digital – traditional media divide. It’s all media after all. 

Via: davaidavai.com

For Real: Beauty.

Posted by: on Mrt 7, 2013 | No Comments

 

Dove strikes again with a fresh take on their “Real Beauty” campaign. This time with a Photoshop action that seeks to un-airbrush unrealistic images of models.

For Real?

For Real?

Posted by: on Mrt 4, 2013 | No Comments

This blog previously appeared on Amsterdamadblog.com

I am currently reading ‘Identity,’ quite an inspiring book by Belgian psychologist Paul Verhaeghe. According to Verhaeghe, our human identity is not something very intimate that exists somewhere deep down inside, waiting to be discovered. What we become largely depends on our experiences: “Identity is a construction of ideas written upon us by our surroundings. The mirror that our environment puts in front of us, determines who we become.” This doesn’t mean we are mere puppets on a string, but it does mean our identity is being shaped by what we choose to internalize from our environment, and what not. An interesting point of view that applies to brand identities as well.